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Regiments of the Malta Garrison
The 7th (Royal Fusiliers) (City of London Regiment)

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The 7th (Royal Fusiliers) (City of London Regiment)

Introduction

The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was raised in London in June 1685 out of two independent companies of Guards stationed at the Tower of London.

In 1747, it was numbered 7th (Royal Fusiliers). It was the first Royal Fusilier Regiment, having been raised by King James II to escort the Train of Artillery. It was armed with the light flintlock fusils rather than the heavy matchlock muskets used by the rest of the infantry.

On 1 July 1881, the First Battalion 7th Regiment became the 1st Battalion The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment). The 3rd Battalion Royal Fusiliers was formed at Curragh on 1 April 1898, and moved to Aldershot on 4 April.

The 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers was formed at Dover on 8 February 1900.

In April 1968, the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) merged with the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers, the 20th Lancashire Fusiliers, and the 6th Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers to form the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

The 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1828 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

31 May 1828 The 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers) was ordered to move to Malta from the Ionian Islands.

26 Sep The 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers) arrived at Malta vice The 80th which embarked from Malta for the Ionian Islands. The regiment had 505 men. These were quartered at Fort Manoel where a substantial number fell ill with intermittent fever.

The following were baptised in 1828:

The following were buried in 1828:

1829 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

Strength (25 Sep 1829): 512 men (6 Coys).

1829 Intermittent fever prevailed in the regiment during the year.

14 Mar Burial of John Edward White infant son of Sgt John White Royal Fusiliers, aged 2 months, (Quarantine Bastion Cemetery Floriana).

The following were baptised in 1829:

1830 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

25 Feb 1830 Strength: 503 men (6 coys).

The following were married in 1830:

The following were baptised in 1830:

The following were buried in 1830:

1831 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1 Apr 1831 Strength: Six companies Rank and File 471 (Effective), 515 (Established).

7 May Lieut the Rt Hon the Earl of Rothes Royal Fusiliers, of Rothes Castle Elginshire and Leslie Castle Fifeshire, married Louisa, third daughter of Colonel Anderson Morshead of Widey Court in the county of Devon, commanding the Royal Engineers at Malta.

The following were baptised in 1831:

The following were buried in 1831:

The following were married in 1831:

1832 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1832 The Royal Fusiliers Regiment was stationed at Floriana Barracks.

The following were baptised in 1832:

The following were buried in 1832:

1833 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

Dec 1832–18 Dec 1833 The Royal Fusiliers was stationed at Floriana Barracks. It then moved to the Cottonera District, where two Companies were stationed at San Francesco de Paolo Barracks, one Company at San Salvatore Barracks, and the rest at Head Quarters.

The average strength of the corps was 470 rank and file, with 264 men between the ages of 18 and 30 years, 10 men under 18 years old, and 40 men aged between 40 and 50 years. The regiment had deployed to Corfu in 1825, so that by 1833, it had completed nine years on foreign service. It had a married fund to support families of married soldiers sick in hospital, and large families in need.

737 cases were admitted to the hospital during the year. There were ten deaths. Soldiers fell ill from:

Acute Catarrh was endemic. It affected the native population as well as troops. Acute Catarrh first appeared among The 42nd in the early winter of 1832 when the regiment was stationed at Floriana Barracks. It then spread to The 7th soon after the latter relieved The 42nd at Floriana at the beginning of 1833. In the 7th Foot, 100 cases were entered in the register by the assistant surgeon under the heading pneumonia, but which were simply cases of acute catarrh. Officers suffered in the same proportion as the troops, but women and children seemed to have been exempt. Only two cases proved fatal.

Acute Catarrh next appeared in The 73rd and The 94th stationed at Fort Lower St Elmo Valletta. It prevailed in the barracks of the 42nd among the men, the officers almost entirely escaping it. In many instances catarrh was accompanied by a cutaneous eruption similar to urticaria. The PMO remarked that Acute Catarrh was the same disease as the influenza which had prevailed in Malta and in almost every part of Europe during that year.

There were six cases of Intermittent Fever. Although this type of fever was rare in Malta, it broke out in young and healthy soldiers who had joined the Head Quarters at Malta in Spring 1833, and in an old soldier who had previously served in the Ionian Islands.

There were eleven cases of Remittent Fever, with two deaths, towards the latter half of July and August 1832.

There were eighty-eight cases of Common Continued Fever with no deaths.

Assistant Inspector of Hospitals John Davy described Acute Rheumatism as those cases such as commonly occur in Malta, and chiefly in the winter season, marked generally by pain and difficulty of motion, and some derangement of general health, and very rarely indeed attended either by redness or swelling of the affected part or by a pyrexial state. The texture affected appears to be more commonly the muscular fibre. The disease yields readily to treatment but is apt to recur.1

The only two fatal cases of dysentery in the garrison occurred in the 7th Royal Fusiliers. Both died from peritonitis; one following a rupture hydatid cyst in his liver, the other from perforation of the bowel.

About a tenth of all those reporting sick in the garrison had a venereal disease. Soldiers generally became infected from frequenting prostitutes who, notwithstanding the vigilance of the police, evaded the weekly inspections carried out by the police physician and his assistants. It was alleged that prostitutes who had descended upon Malta from Naples, had indiscriminate intercourse with sailors from all ports of the Mediterranean and passed on venereal diseases to the troops. A regimental order made it compulsory for soldiers to point out the women who had infected them. Their allegations were then passed on to the civil police. Soldiers who concealed their infection or who refused to divulge the house they frequented, were on their discharge from hospital, made to complete those duties which sickness had previously prevented them performing, and were additionally equitably punished.

Sixty two regimental children were treated during the year. Two died from pneumonia, two from diarrhoea. Ascaris lumbricoides, Ascaris vermicularis, and Taenia vulgaris were common intestinal parasites among the regimental children.

The following were married in 1833:

The following were baptised in 1833:

The following were buried in 1833:

1834 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1 Jan 1834 Strength: 19 Officers and 470 men.

The following were married in 1834:

The following were baptised in 1834:

The following were buried in 1834:

1835 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

The 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers) occupied the right wing of Lower St Elmo Barracks, with a detachment of a subaltern and 60 men at Fort Ricasoli. The regimental strength was 649 men. The men were enlisted mainly from Lancashire, Lincoln and York. There were only 95 Irish and 20 Scottish soldiers in the regiment.

There were 487 cases treated during the year with nine deaths. Thirty eight cases of fever were admitted into the regimental hospital. Most were mild with the soldiers making a rapid recovery. A few presented with typhoid and liver infection.

The following were married in 1835:

The following were baptised in 1835:

The following were buried in 1835:

1836 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

21 Jan 1836 The 7th Royal Fusiliers was ordered to return to England having served over eleven years on foreign service. A detachment of 172 men, 13 women and 18 children embarked for England on the transport Sovereign, which also carted away from Malta old naval stores.

8 Mar 1836 313 men of the 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers) embarked for England.

The following were baptised in 1836:

The following were buried in 1836:

1837 1st/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

21 Mar 1837 Burial of Ellen Colquhoun aged 3 months, daughter of Pte A. Colquhoun.

The 1st/Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

1959 1st/Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

1960 1st/Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

The 2nd/The 7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1854 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

17 Apr 1854 The 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers) arrived from Southampton on the West India Company's Steamer Orinoco.

Apr The 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers) left for the Crimea (1854-56).

6 Oct Burial of Lt Molesworth 7th Fusiliers.

1855 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

The following were buried in 1855:

1856 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

24 June 1856 Burial of Pte Joseph Tween aged 24 years.

The 2nd/The 7th (Royal Fusiliers)

1863 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

14 Sep 1863 The 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers) arrived from Gibraltar and relieved the 2nd/15th Regiment.

27 Dec Death of Pte P. B., aged 31 years, from a ruptured aneurysm of the coeliac artery. He had developed a pain in his epigastric region while marching from St George's Bay a week prior to his admission to hospital on 6 December 1863.

In 1863, the regiment had an average strength of 246 men, 300 hospital admissions (1219.5 admissions per 1000 of mean strength) with 1 death in hospital (4.06 deaths per 1000 of mean strength).

The regiment was quartered at Isola Gate and Polverista Barracks.

1864 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

In 1864, the regiment had an average strength of 826 men, 1057 hospital admissions (1280 admissions per 1000 of mean strength) with 1 death in hospital and 1 out of hospital (2.42 deaths per 1000 of mean strength).

The 2nd/7th had a large number of admissions for ophthalmia.

5 Aug 1864 Death of Sgt Edward Tanner 2nd Royal Fusiliers, aged 24 years 6 months. (Quarantine Bastion Cemetery Floriana).

1865 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers)

In 1865, the regiment had an average strength of 224 men. There were 237 hospital admissions (1058 admissions per 1000 of mean strength) with 1 death in hospital (4.46 deaths per 1000 of mean strength). Measles was very prevalent among the children of the 2nd/7th during the early months of the year.

22 Apr 1865 The 2nd/7th (Royal Fusiliers) embarked for Canada, where it arrived on 15 May 1865.

The 3rd/The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)

1898 3rd/Royal Fusiliers (City of London)

30 Nov 1898 The 3rd Battalion Royal Fusiliers embarked at Southampton from Dover. It arrived at Malta on 9 December.

The battalion had an average strength of 59 men with 50 admissions (847 admissions/1000 strength) into hospital and 1 death (16.95/1000 strength).

The 3rd/Royal Fusiliers moved into quarters at St Clements' and Verdala Barracks for 23 days.

17 Dec 1898 Burial of Pte Alfred Nailor aged 25 years, in Rinella Military Cemetery. Pte Nailor died in Cottonera.

1899 3rd/Royal Fusiliers (City of London)

1 Jan 1899 994 men were at St Clement's Camp, but moved to Fort Manoel on 1 June 1899.

27 Aug The 3rd/Royal Fusiliers embarked for Gibraltar on the transport Jelunga where it arrived on 31 August.

14 Mar 1899 Burial of Pte Herbert Porter aged 29 years, in Rinella Military Cemetery. Pte Porter died in Cottonera.

The 1st/1st Battalion (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

The 1st Battalion City of London (The Royal Fusiliers) was raised in 1860 as the 19th Middlesex Rifle Volunteers (Bloomsbury). It was a volunteer battalion of The Royal Fusiliers prior to 1908, when its title changed to The 1st City of London Battalion (The Royal Fusiliers) The London Regiment.

In 1922, it became The 1st City of London Regiment (The Royal Fusiliers) The London Regiment, and in 1937, The 8th (1st City of London) Battalion The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

1914 1st/1st (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

4 Sep 1914 The 1/1st (City of London) sailed from Southampton on 4 September 1914.

11 Sep It was decided that one half battalion should be stationed at Fort Manoel and the other at Floriana Barracks. Casemate Barracks Floriana were to be kept clear on account of the POWs.

13 Sep H.T. ships Gallicia, Nevasa and Galika arrived with the Territorial Brigade of the 1st City of London Royal Fusiliers.

28 Dec 1914 The three Territorial Infantry Battalions that were about to leave Malta returned to the Army Ordnance Department their web equipment which was not considered fit to take into the field.

1915 1st/1st (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

11 Feb 1915 The 1/1st (City of London) left Malta for Avonmouth.

The 2nd/1st Battalion (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

1915 2nd/1st (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

11 Feb 1915 The 2nd/1st (City of London) disembarked from S.S. Galeka.

27 Aug The 2nd/1st (City of London) moved to Egypt and fought in the Gallipoli Campaign.

The 1st/2nd Battalion (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

The 1st/2nd Battalion City of London (The Royal Fusiliers) was raised in 1860 as the 46th Middlesex Volunteers Rifle Corps. It was a volunteer battalion of the Royal Fusiliers prior to 1908, when its title changed to the 2nd City of London Battalion (The Royal Fusiliers) the London Regiment.

In 1922, it became the 2nd City of London Regiment (The Royal Fusiliers) the London Regiment, and in 1937, the 9th (2nd City of London) Battalion the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

In 1949, it was converted into the 624th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment Royal Artillery (Royal Fusiliers).

1914 1st/2nd (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

4 Sep 1914 The 1st/2nd (City of London) sailed from Southampton on S. S. Nevasa.

14 Sep The 1st/2nd (City of London) disembarked at Malta.

16 Sep The 1st/2nd (City of London) Regiment took over guard duty from KOMRM which moved into its war station.

Oct 1914 Scarlet fever broke out in the men at St Andrew's Barracks.

1915 1st/2nd (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

2 Jan 1915 The 1st/2nd (City of London) left for Marseilles on the S.S. Neuralia. Captain McHoul RAMC (T) was in medical charge of the 1st/2nd Battalion. The troops were informed that they were returning to England, but their destination was France.

The 2nd/2nd Battalion (City of London Reserve Battalion) (Royal Fusiliers)

1915 2nd/2nd (City of London Reserve Battalion) Royal Fusiliers

31 Dec 1914 The 2nd/2nd (City of London Reserve Battalion) arrived from Tonbridge on H. T. Neuralia and Avon. It relieved the 1st/2nd (City of London) Royal Fusiliers. It occupied St Andrew's Barracks.

15 Jan 1915 An outbreak of mumps was reported in the 2nd/2nd (Reserve) Bn London Regiment at St Andrew's Barracks. The Battalion was isolated with the infected treated in barrack rooms. The men were kept in quarantine for 24 days. By 22 January there were 13 cases of mumps in St Andrew's Barracks. The last in a servant employed in the officers mess.

15 Feb The detachment of the 2nd (City of London) Regiment at Salvatore Barracks was relieved by a detachment of the KOMRM.

1 Mar Quarantine regulations at St Andrew's Barracks were lifted. Lieut A Carlisle RAMC (T) took medical charge of to 2/2nd London Regiment at St Andrew's Barracks.

15 Apr The 2nd/2nd (City of London Reserve Battalion) were issued with camp equipment on vacating St Andrew's Barracks.

27 Aug 1915 The 2nd/2nd (City of London Reserve Battalion) moved to Egypt in preparation for landing at Cape Helles on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 13 Oct 1915.

The 1st/3rd Battalion (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

The 3rd Battalion City of London (The Royal Fusiliers) was raised in 1859 as the 20th Middlesex Rifle Volunteers. It was a volunteer battalion of the Royal Fusiliers prior to 1908, when its title changed to the 3rd City of London Battalion (The Royal Fusiliers) the London Regiment.

In 1922, it became The 3rd City of London Regiment (the Royal Fusiliers) the London Regiment and in 1937, the 10th (3rd City of London) Battalion the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).

In 1949, it was converted into the 625th Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment Royal Artillery (Royal Fusiliers).

1914 1st/3rd (City of London) Royal Fusiliers

4 Sep 1914 The 1st/3rd (City of London) sailed from Southampton on S. S. Nevasa. It disembarked at Malta on 14 September.

1915 1st/3rd (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

2 Jan 1915 The 1/3rd (City of London) left Malta for Marseilles on the H.T. Avon. Captain Hobbs RAMC (T) was in medical charge of the 3rd Battalion. The troops were informed that they were returning to England, but their destination was France.

The 2nd/3rd Battalion (City of London Reserve Battalion) (Royal Fusiliers)

1915 2nd/3rd (City of London Reserve Battalion)

31 Dec 1914 The 2nd/3rd (City of London Reserve Battalion) arrived from Tonbridge England on H. T. Neuralia and Avon.
It relieved the 1/3rd (City of London) Battalion (Royal Fusiliers). The men moved into Mtarfa Barracks.

18 Jan 1915 An outbreak of mumps was reported in the 3rd (Reserve) Bn London Regiment at Mtarfa Barracks.

2 Feb The men moved to the Musketry Camp Ghajn Tuffieha Camp. Surgeon Major Robert Randon was in medical charge.

5 Mar Quarantine period due to mumps on 3rd Reserve Bn Royal Fusiliers at Mtarfa Barracks was lifted.

30 Mar One sergeant and 16 men of 2nd/3rd London Regiment reported to Mtarfa Hospital to help expand the hospital.

8 Apr Stores returned from Mtarfa Barracks to Marina Ordnance depôt by 2nd/3rd (City of London) in preparations for their embarkation on H. T. Suevic.

9 Apr 1915 Issue of pistols to 2/3rd City of London Regiment. The 2/3rd London Regiment embarked on H. T. Suevic for Alexandria, Egypt. The ship was filthy. It was a horse boat and was unsuitable for troops.

The 1st/4th Battalion (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

The 4th Battalion City of London (The Royal Fusiliers) was raised in 1860 as the Tower Hamlet Rifles. It was a volunteer battalion of The Royal Fusiliers prior to 1908, when its title changed to The 4th City of London Battalion (The Royal Fusiliers) the London Regiment.

In 1922 it became The 4th Battalion City of London Regiment (The Royal Fusiliers) The London Regiment.

In 1949 it was converted into The 460th Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment Royal Artillery (City of London).

1914 1st/4th (City of London)

4 Sep 1914 The 1st/4th (City of London) sailed from Southampton and disembarked at Malta on 14 September on S. S. Gallicia.

On 12 September 1914 a tented camp had been prepared at Ghajn Tuffieha for the reception of the Territorials. Two thousand blankets were sent to the camp by the Ordnance stores. On 11 October, L/Cpl Britton Military Foot Police (MFP) proceeded to Ghajn Tuffieha for duty with the 4th Bn London Regiment.

23 Dec 1914 Ordnance Stores Malta manufactured 750 identity discs for 4th Bn City of London Regiment.

1915 1st/4th (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers)

2 Jan 1915 The 1st/4th (City of London) left Malta for Marseilles on the H.T. Avon. Lieut P Casey RAMC (T) was in medical charge of the 4th Battalion. The troops were informed that they were returning to England while their destination was France.

The 2nd/4th Battalion (City of London Reserve Battalion) (Royal Fusiliers)

1915 2nd/4th (City of London Reserve Battalion) (Royal Fusiliers)

31 Dec 1914 The 2nd/4th (City of London Reserve Battalion) arrived from Maidstone England on H. T. Neuralia and Avon. It relieved the 1st/4th (City of London) (Royal Fusiliers). The men moved into St George's Barracks.

27 Feb 1915 At Floriana Barracks.

5 Mar Relieved the KOMRM at Salvatore Barracks.

6 Mar Lt Col Edmond W St Vincent Ryan RAMC (T) reported a case of mumps in a man of the machine gun section 2nd/4th London Regiment now at Pembroke Camp. The case was isolated at once but later developed tonsillitis only. No further cases of mumps occurred at St George's Camp and the quarantine restrictions were lifted on 14 March.

25 May Issued with camp equipment by the Ordnance Stores on vacating Floriana Barracks.

25 Aug 1915 The 2nd/4th (City of London Reserve Battalion) left for Egypt in preparation for the landing at Cape Helles on the Gallipoli Peninsula on 15 Oct 1915.

Bibliography