RAMC

Regiments of the Malta Garrison
The 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

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The 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

Introduction

The 18th Foot was raised in 1684, as Colonel the Earl of Granard's Regiment of Foot.

In 1751, it was numbered 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment.

On 1 July 1881, under the Cardwell reforms, The 18th (Royal Irish) Regiment became The Royal Irish Regiment.

The Royal Irish Regiment was disbanded in 1922 on the foundation of the Irish Free State.

The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1801 1st/18th (Royal Irish) (Pulteney's Regiment)

1 Nov 1801 Strength: 21 Commissioned and Warrant Officers, 75 NCOs, 334 rank and file fit for duty, 79 rank and file sick, 525 total officers and men, 712 establishment.

1802 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

1 Jan 1802 The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) was at Elba.

The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1821 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

Apr 1821 The 1st/18th arrived from England.

Inspector of Hospitals John Hennen reported that the 18th Foot had between a hundred to two hundred men unfit for Malta, and a burden to the service, labouring under the effects of repeated attacks of fever and hepatic diseases contracted in the West Indies, and also from pulmonary afflictions.1

The following were baptised in 1821:

1822 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

1822 The 1st/18th had its HQ at Cospicua (Bormla), with a detachment of 52 men at Gozo. The regimental hospital was at Fort Ricasoli.

A regimental soldier was transferred from the Ophthalmia Ward in the Military Hospital Valletta to the Regimental Hospital of the 18th Regiment at Fort Ricasoli for the benefit of a change of air. Staff Surgeon James Dillon Tully said that the patient had an opaque cornea of his left eye before he left for England, and his health had been a good deal impaired by a long confinement in hospital.

The following were baptised in 1822:

1823 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

1823 The regiment had 593 men with an average daily sick of 31. The ratio of sick to well was 1:18. The prevailing diseases were: continued fever, pulmonary and bowel disorders, and venereal complaints. In 1823, the regiment moved from Valletta to Floriana replacing 80th Foot.

The following were married in 1823:

The following were baptised in 1823:

The following died in 1823:

1824 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

24 Jan 1824 Death of Pte John Vennard 18th Royal Irish Regiment, aged 25 years who was buried in the Quarantine Bastion Cemetery Floriana.

May 1824 The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) embarked for the Ionian Islands. It was replaced by 95th Foot.

The following were baptised in 1824:

1826 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

The following were baptised in 1826:

19 Dec 1827 Died at Malta Lt Col Smyth half pay 94th Foot late of 18th Foot.

The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1830 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

12 Dec 1830 The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment was in contingent with the 90th Foot and 95th Foot which sailed from Corfu, when, on 18 Dec 1830, it was wrecked on the coast of Sicily. The 18th Foot re-embarked on HMS Madagascar on 23 December. It disembarked at Malta on 24 December 1830.

1831 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

1831 Listed as being in Corfu.

8 July Baptism of Sophia Hammell daughter of Major Robert Hammell and Helen, born on 12 June 1831.

The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1856 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1872 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

18 Jan 1872 The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) embarked at Queenstown and arrived in Malta from Fermoy Ireland on 30 January 1872.

In 1872, the 1st/18th had an average strength of 612 men. It had 770 admissions (1258/1000 mean strength) into hospital with 4 deaths in hospital and 1 out of hospital (8.17/1000 mean strength).

Its average strength from 30 June to 30 September was 694 men. During this third quarter of the year when fevers were prevalent, the regiment had a total of 333 hospital admissions with 2 deaths.

It had: 4 cases of enteric fever with 1 death, 115 of continued fevers with 1 death and 214 of febricula with no deaths. The only fatal case of enteric fever in the 18th Foot, was one admitted from Fort Ricasoli in September.

The regiment brought measles into the station. Of the 9 reported cases among the troops, seven occurred in the 1st/18th Regiment. The disease prevailed to a considerable extent among the families of the soldiers during the year, 93 attacks and 8 deaths being recorded from it.

The men were quartered at Fort Ricasoli, San Salvatore Barracks, and Zabbar Gate Barracks. They were in camp until 28 February.

1873 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

In 1873, the 1st/18th had an average strength of 671 men. It had 417 admissions (621.5/1000 mean strength) into hospital with 9 deaths (13.41/1000 mean strength). The men were at Fort Ricasoli.

1874 1st/18th (Royal Irish)

The 1st/18th Regiment had an average strength of 516 men. It had 280 admissions (542.6/1000 mean strength) into hospital with 3 deaths including 1 among the invalids (5.81 deaths/1000 mean strength). It had 17 invalids returned to England. A soldier of the 1st/18th Regiment was killed from a gun-shot. The men at Verdala Barracks.

20 Oct 1874 The 1st/18th (Royal Irish) embarked for Bombay where it arrived on 15 November 1874. It was relieved in Malta by the 101st Royal Bengal Fusiliers.

The 2nd/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

1883 2nd/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment

23 Feb 1883 The 2nd/18th embarked at Egypt on 18 Feb 1883. It disembarked at Malta on 23 Feb 1883.

The 2nd/Royal Irish Regiment had an average strength of 191 men. It had 105 admissions (549.7/1000 mean strength) into hospital with no deaths. 1 invalid was returned to England.

Its average constantly sick was 8.28 (43.85/1000 mean strength). The average sick time to each soldier was 15.82 days. The average duration of cases of sickness was 28.78 days.

The 2nd/Royal Irish Regiment left for Portsmouth and Aldershot on 17 May 1883.

1884 2nd/18th (Royal Irish)

The 2nd/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment left Aldershot for Portsmouth on 28 Feb 1884. It disembarked at Malta on 10 Mar 1884.

The 2nd/Royal Irish Regiment had an average strength of 743 men. It had 718 admissions (966.3/1000 mean strength) into hospital with 13 deaths (17.49 deaths/1000 mean strength). 13 invalids returned to England. Its average constantly sick was 52.02 (70.01/1000 mean strength). The average sick time to each soldier was 25.62 days. The average duration of cases of sickness was 26.51 days.

The 2nd/Royal Irish Regiment had 15 admissions into hospital with pneumonia soon after the regiment had disembarked; 14 were transferred from hospital on board ship. A private soldier died after falling down 7.6 meters into the ditch of the fortifications.

1885 2nd/18th (Royal Irish)

7 Jan 1885 The 2nd/18th (Royal Irish) Regiment left for Rawalpindi Bengal India, but 29 soldiers were still in Malta in June 1885.

Bibliography